Research on the Benefits of Drinking Tea

Research on the Benefits of Drinking Tea:

Drinking health teas such as, green tea, oolong tea, white tea, sencha tea and rooibus tea researching is showing offer many potential benefits.

Researchers have found that caffeine and catechins, which are natural substances found in tea may help promote weight loss. These two ingredients increase the rate of metabolism and burning of fat. Green tea in particular is rich in catechins and caffeine. Read the the research here: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/98/6/1682S.full

Still there is another interesting study from Japan: Researchers studied 83,269 adults in Japan who were between the ages of 45 and 74 years. They observed their consumption of coffee and green tea for about 13 years to find out if it will have an effect on their cardiovascular health. The results obtained from the study indicated there is a relationship between high intake of coffee and green tea and a lower risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/257760.php

Those who consumed green tea often (a minimum of 4 cups of six ounces daily) were about 30 percent less prone to have stroke when compared with those who did not.

There is more research on the polyphenols in health teas focusing on their the strength and quality of bones. This is particularly important in people who are prone to developing osteoporosis. In one study, drinking tea was shown to reduce the risk of experiencing hip fractures in adults above the age of 50 years – read it here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2754215/

Researchers have observed that the caffeine and theanine – an amino acid in tea – provide some psychological benefits to tea drinkers. They help to increase alertness and improve performance. For instance, in a study, subjects took 2 or 3 cups of tea within one and a half hours and their performance on attention related tasks improved. They also experienced a better mood and stronger feelings of alertness check it out here: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/98/6/1700S.full